Blog

How to Detect and Prevent Skin Cancer

According to recent data, Door County has the highest rate of skin cancer in Wisconsin and its rate is twice the state average! As summer heats up, and to celebrate UV Safety Awareness month, Door County Medical Center is providing important information about how to detect and prevent skin cancer. 

Three Forms of Skin Cancer

To better detect skin cancer, it is important to understand the three forms of skin cancer:

  1. Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 96,480 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. and an estimated 7,230 people will die from the disease in 2019. Melanoma will look like a new mole that has an unusual appearance. The mole can have ragged and uneven edges with shades ranging from black to tan. The biggest indicator of melanoma is if the mole is constantly changing.

  2. Basal cell is caused by sun exposure and can also develop in those who have received radiation therapy as a child. Basal cell carcinoma will look like a reddish patch on the skin that is itchy but barely hurts. It may look like a pink, red or white growth with an undefined border. Basal cell spots can become an open sore that bleeds or crusts without closing for several weeks. 

  3. Squamous cell is usually caused by sun exposure and can be seen on different parts of the skin. Squamous cell is a wart-like growth that has a rough surface and a central depression. This form of skin cancer can also develop sores that stay open for weeks.

The Risk Factors

Although those with fair skin types are more likely to burn by sun exposure and have a higher risk of skin cancer, any skin color can be affected by skin cancer. Other risk factors include: 

  • Long periods of sun exposure (UVA)

  • Tanning bed use

  • History of sunburns

  • Have had skin cancer before

  • Weakened or suppressed immune system

  • Moles

  • Family history of skin cancer 

How to Prevent Skin Cancer 

  • Limit sun exposure of both UVA and UVB rays

  • Never use tanning beds (no amount of exposure is safe)

  • Wear sun-protective clothing

  • Wear sunscreen with SPF 30 or more

  • Conduct regular self-examinations of your skin

According to DCMC Urgent Care provider Dr. Sandra Martens, “The best sunscreen is the one you actually use.” Sprays, creams and sticks are all effective. 

It is important to talk with your doctor right away if you notice any changes in your skin or moles. 

Published 7/17/2019 11:58:53 AM
Tags: cancer, news, prevention, skin cancer, summer, sun care

Search our blog

Popular Tags

3D Mammography   addiction   advance directive   Affective   alcohol   Algoma   als   alzheimer's disease   Ambassador   American College of Healthcare Executives   anti-bullying   apnea   art for health   art gallery   athletic edge camp   Auxiliary   award   awards   Awareness   behavioral health   Bravo   Breast Cancer Awareness Month   breast cancer prevention   Brian   brussels sprout slaw   C.H.I.P.   cancer   cardiac   cardiopulmonary services   catholic   ceremony   certification   children   cold flu prevention   colon cancer   colonoscopy   community health   Community outreach   CT scanner   cyberbullying   da Vinci Surgical System   Daylight Savings Time   DCMC Auxiliary   dementia   dentist   depression   diabetes   diagnostic imaging   Diana Wallace   diet   Disorder   donate   donor   door county half marathon   door county schools   Dr. Reisner   Dr. Rory Johnson   Dr. Shaun Melarvie   Education   emergency department   employee art   exercise   Family   family medicine   family practice   farmer's market   fitness   five   fundraiser   Gerald   GERD   handwashing   health tips   healthcare   healthcare leader   healthy eating   heart   heart healthy   heartburn   hernia   hernia screening   HOPELINE   hospice   hospital   House and Garden Walk   HPV   Human Kindness Project   immunization   insomnia   internships   jody boes   June   kelsie ladick   Kids' health   LEAP   life   living will   luke spude   lyme disease   mammography   marinara sauce   memory   memory clinic   memory loss   men's health   men's health month   mental health   ministry   ministry fund   MRI   national heath decisions day   New Year   newborn   news   North Shore Medical Clinic   nursing   nursing program   nutrition   nwtc   obesity   OB-GYN   OPSU   organ   outpatient surgery   patient care   Patti Balestrieri   Paula Hobart   pelvic health   physical activity   physical therapy   post exercise tips   PRC   prevention   primary care   Providers   recipe   recovery   reflux   rehab services   resolutions   running   SAAM   SAD   scholarship   scholarships   School Nursing   Seasonal   Seniors   sexual assault   Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner   Shop and Dine Day   Sister Bay   skilled nursing   skilled nursing facility   skin cancer   Sleep   sleep disorder   sleep lab   snf   social justice   sports medicine   sports training   star   state-of-the-art   Stephens   stroke patients   studer group   suicide awareness   suicide awareness month   suicide prevention   summer   summer programs   sun care   surgery   sweet dreams   technology   Teen health   Teens   The Community's Garden   The Healing Project   ticks   training tips   Treatment   urgent care   vaccination   vaccinations   volunteers   Wendy Ulrikson   women's center   women's health   work injuries   Worrick   youth workshops